Research Serendipity, a blog from Hawk Mountain blog

JF reviews American kestrel nest box data with intern, Jenna Schlener. Photo by Gigi Romano.

Research Serendipity

By JF Therrien, Senior Research Biologist
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary
Raptor Diaries

Hawk Mountain has a rich research and monitoring history. For several decades now, on-staff researchers have been carrying the torch, keeping numerous inestimable monitoring projects going. The migration counts conducted at Hawk Mountain indeed represents the longest running raptor monitoring project in the world.

Starting some 80+ years ago, the counts were first designed to assess the usefulness of the protection offered by the newly created Sanctuary. Not long after, Hawk Mountain’s curator Maurice Broun and others realized the invaluable long-term data set that those counts represent and they could be used to study population trends of 16 North American raptor species. Then in the mid-1950s, Alex Nagy, then Hawk Mountain’s assistant curator, installed a few bird boxes on his farm to see if he could get American kestrels to use them. What most likely started as a humble backyard experiment resulted in what is now the American Kestrel Nest Box Program, which will proudly celebrate its 65th-anniversary next spring.

Research Serendipity, a blog by Hawk Mountain

JF holds a newly tagged black vulture named Versace. Photo by Rebekah Smith.

Research and monitoring projects sometimes begin after a carefully designed approach. However, in reality, many such projects simply start serendipitously, as in the previous examples. Traveling around Hawk Mountain to visit the 125 man-made nest boxes of the American Kestrel Nest Box Program during summer 2017, we noticed odd and conspicuous behaviors of bigger, darker birds. Indeed on distinct occasions, black vultures would suddenly appear flying low overhead or even flying out a window from the very barns our kestrel nest boxes are attached to. At that point, we had little doubt; those vultures are likely using the building to nest.

 

From a research point of view, having access to nest sites is highly valuable. In addition to being able to handle adults and chicks to assess their life history traits (body condition, growth rate, disease prevalence, etc.), monitoring nesting activities allows us to assess breeding success and breeding rate, age at first breeding, and nest site fidelity on the population level over time. Those aspects are all immensely important to understand the complete cycle of individuals that compose populations.  Click here to continue reading blog.

Read more interesting stories about Hawk Mountain Sanctuary at Raptor Diaries.